Delaware Hip-Hop Super Show



Saturday January 27, 2007

Colosseum

1206 North Union Street

Wilmington

Doors open at 8pm

Inteviews by GJ
article originally published in the News Journal

From Clifford Brown to George Thorogood and through to Grand G, Delaware has a history of outstanding musical talent. Clifford Brown died tragically at the young age of 26, yet his accomplishments are still remembered fondly at the annual Jazz festival which bears his name. George Thorogood is a rock and roll star whose original line up were dubbed the "Delaware Destroyers" and he is still touring the globe during a career which includes a series of gold records and spans decades. Grand G has been rocking the stage in Delaware since the late 1980's and is poised to make big waves in 2007 as he leads a new generation of Delaware musicians who usher in the Hip-Hop era. Grand G will be returning to the Delaware stage on January 27th at the Colosseum in Wilmington and will be bringing together the state's best and brightest stars for a home grown Delaware event that promises to be a legendary evening.

Grand G
myspace.com/grandg

When did you start making music?

I started writing lyrics in 1984 and making music around 1987.

Who were the early artists locally and nationally that you looked up to?

Well, locally there really wasn't anyone doing their thing except my peers and myself. I had love for Disco Beave and Doc D. Nationally, no questions, it was Big Daddy Kane, KRS-One and Rakim.

What projects are you working on currently?

Currently we have a CD out called "Behind Da Wire: Corner Stories" with RocStar, B. Cyllz and myself on it. There will be solo projects coming out soon for all of us. I also have an R&B group called K.A.Y. I'm working on, these girls have voices out of this world. I'm doing production on Suspect, Goods and Lee-Lee CDs, also. Just trying to stay busy. Stacbeatz is the production company we created so piling up beats is the game.

Do you listen to the radio?

Yeah, I listen now more so than I did in the past. I normally tune into 101.7 KISS, gotta support my hometown, always.

What do you think of Delaware's current live music scene?

Well, in that area we have to make some major improvements. There are venues to get it cracking here but we need more support from fans and business owners to promote and push local artists. If we support us the rest of the world will recognize.

What was the first hip hop show you attended in Delaware?

I remember going to the Delaware Armory to see Rakim perform. The show was off the chain. He was rocking a velour NIKE track suit.

What's the best thing about Delaware right now?

I think the best thing going is the Hip-Hop community is finally trying to stick together for one common cause. Even though everyone is doing their own thing, we are generally trying to build a strong movement together.

What will it take to get Delaware to be as successful musically as the other large markets on the east coast?

Oh that's easy....Support each other. Buy local artist CDs...Come to the shows and support. People here will go buy an artist CD who doesn't know anything about their struggle here or what's popping and feed his piggy bank but not someone right from their own hood, that's crazy. We have the same things going on right here that is no different then any other city just maybe on a smaller scale... feel me.

Any final thoughts?

I would just like to thank everyone who has supported me from then to now and encouraged me to never let go of Hip-Hop. The love the streets have given me from my peers is truly appreciated. Let's do this thing real big in 007 and let the rest of the world know that Delaware isn't just a place to send your credit card payments... 1 mil

Soviet Union
soviethiphop.com
mypace.com/sovietz

When did you start making music?

We both started back in the 80's during Hip Hop's golden years. We were B-Boys then and we're still B-boys to this day. We met in 2000 in a mutual friend's studio, we later got together and took it serious and opened a recording business called Iron Kurtainz Recordings, Inc. then began recruiting local talent to launch a 1st State movement. We are the founders the Hammer & Syckle of the Soviet Union.

Who were the early artists locally and nationally that you looked up to?


Locally there was Disco Beave, Grand G, Kenny G, Raw, all from Wilmington, Parry P, Schoolly D, 100X, EST, Krown Rulers, Poor Righteous Teachers, Brand Nubian, Public Enemy, Boogie Down Productions, Kool G Rap & Polo, MC Shan, Lord Finesse, Big L, Big Pun, Chino XL, Too Short, Spice 1, Ice T, Ice Cube, Gangstarr, Ultra Magnetic, Jungle Brothers this is just to name a few... There's many more.


What projects are you working on currently?

We are currently working on the album "Life After Juice" a Radimez LP, which consist of some collaborations with company artist and outside affiliates. Also, look out for "Bling Bling" our Reggaeton artist working on his solo album. We just dropped a double Mix Compilation CD with DJ Mega Skillz hitting the streets and stands this month.

Do you listen to the radio?

Yes and No! When we're out of town, yes, when we are in the city, no! Because local radio really hasn't done anything for us, and they play the same songs over and over again, these local radio stations don't have any local artist in rotation, and that's a problem for them this year. Some have a come up show or local talents showcase but not often enough to make an impact on the listeners. I think the program directors figure one song or a half hour radio spot with commercials is enough to satisfy a whole region wanting to hear their favorite local artist. Since you asked, I believe they fear local artist taking control of the ratings by overwhelming state support.

What do you think of Delaware's current live music scene?

It has a lot of potential being that no artist broke a record here yet. Delaware has its own sound and its own movements, and there's so much talent in DE. We're the 1st state and it's enough to talk about...

What's the story behind the name Soviet Union? Is it political?

That's our most frequently asked question and we will be happy to tell you. First of all, it has nothing to do with Russia, it does have to do with the ways they kept order and achieved maximum results by being self reliant. The SOVIET UNION is a unification of go extra hard Breakers, Deejay's, and Graffiti artist well equipped in the elements of Hip-Hop. Every movement has a message and ours is to preserve Hip-Hop's identity because it has been spoiled with bad judgment and poor quality. That being said, it's not what you do, it's how you do it. Our company takes pride in not having to bend for a break, we set up a network of experienced engineer's, producers, and artists from the Tri State area to accomplish quality recordings and complete our mission in music.

Yall have had your multimedia game tight for quite some time, I remember Baby (Radimez) used to bring some home movies over to Henry's Bike and Skateboard Shop years ago where I worked. It's good to see the cinematic angle still improving, how much video do you have altogether?


Yea! We still going hard on the video scene. Still got my skateboard ready to get in. Right now I'm shooting videos so the world can get a glimpse of the RADIMEZ, we also getting the scene set to shoot a mini movie. We have some exclusives on Myspace and YouTube, we gonna keep putting out some original material, might see me doing a half pipe in a video one day you gotta check em out!

You still got a skateboard?


You know I got my board but lately I've been on the track boards making this music!

Any final thoughts?

We would like to thank you for taking time and support it's been a pleasure!! We reppin' Delaware to the fullest, Claymont to Delmar. We have many services such as equipment repairing, studio development, DVD authoring, CD duplication, recording, production, video production, graphic design, and custom designed clothing.

Son Delorian
SattoriEntertainment.com

When did you start making music?

I started making music when my sisters coerced me to rap for their boyfriends over the telephone. Then as I went to visit my next door neighbor "PopPop" Boise Lowery - he taught me a few things that went over my head, and from then on, I loved music from a distance. I finally got the urge to rap at the age of 13 and officially started at 15 or 16 freestyling... It was a match made in heaven from then on.

Who were the early artists that you looked up to?

Boise Lowery. Michael Jackson. Bobby Womack [thanks to daddy I'm "California Dreamin"]. Michael Jordan.

What projects are you working on currently?

Personal albums and 2BuildANation - A collective of Delaware musicians together for the purpose of establishing a foundation for our artists. CERPAH Initiative which is a multi-level, multi-faceted, multi-cultural approach to meeting the needs of young people while simultaneously and therapeutically healing dis-ease by recognizing, acknowledging and cultivating their inherent talents and potential. This program was and is designed for at-risk youth in enterprise neighborhoods but has served from infants to 100 year old seniors, all talent levels.

Do you listen to the radio?

No. Unless I'm in the car with my father, then its WDAS.

What do you think of Delaware's current live music scene?

It's on the come up. Entrepreneurs need to start handling their business right, then artists won't be canceling on yall.

What's the story behind the name Son Delorian?

Son is multiple acronyms and is for all of the great son's of our world like Jesus. Delorian split, " Del" for Delaware, "Orian" for the constellation. Together for the "BackToTheFuture" concept. I am Delaware's shining star. Also my initials are S.D. [SonDelorian] the exact opposite of my birth name D.S.[DavidStanley] , and yes I am a true 'Stan' - to the point where I can mimic my favorite rappers to a 'T'.

You are a very creative person. What other disciplines do you study?

"Information Architecture" is a brand new one that they are starting to incorporate with the latest blog uproar. Also, branding [strategy + management], graphic design, web design, photography and video.

What's the best thing about Delaware?

"Nicky" DuPont, Boise Lowery and our history.

Most memorable Delaware concert experience?

The hair shows I used to dance in for Richard Leroi aka "CheChe".

Any final thoughts?

A foundation is needed to preserve what we have, the children/youth here are idle, they want to entertain, please let's patronize this appetite. The youth no longer play sports and the dream of 'making it' is not a mentality for our environment, the sign says ' Wilmington, a Place to Be Somebody' so lets help them be all they can.

Bobby Cyllz
myspace.com/bcyllz

When did you start making music?

1989, me and my cousin Cool Dre use to chill up in mom's spot taping over tapes, freestyling to instrumentals.

Who were the early artists locally and nationally that you looked up to?

Cats like Doc D., Disco Beave, Isaiah, Grand G., and all them cats that remain nameless in the cypher pit. Nationally who can refuse that cats like KRS, The R., Naughty, Tuff Crew, Big Daddy Kane, Kool G., man the list goes on and on. B.I.G., Pun, Pac, Jay-Z, Nas, Snoop, those cats helped me to understand that it all starts with a dream.

What projects are you working on currently?

Currently, I just finished the Behind the Wire/Corner Music CD with Roc Star and Grand G. At this time I'm performing and shopping beats for my solo project.

Do you listen to the radio?

Sometimes, the radio right now is depressing. I love what DJ Rated-R is doing on Saturdays 101.7 kissing the foreheads of the other stations, ha. Q-Deezy on 98.9 Friday nights, I love what he is doing right now.

What do you think of Delaware's current live music scene?

It could be better but that comes in due time from people like GJ and Real McCoy Troy and anyone whose pushing and grinding.

What was the first hip-hop show you attended in Delaware?

The Tuff Crew concert in Christiana Park that done it for me. I was hooked, the way the crowd participated, I loved the energy.

What's the best thing about Delaware right now?

That we have so much to offer the rest of the world with our talent and drive. This state is a melting pot waiting to be served to the industry.

What will it take to get Delaware to be as successful musically as the other large markets on the east coast?

Cooperation, unity and support. Support is what you see when you see your favorite entertainer. It takes a team of supporters to make that finished product that you see on that screen. Without support 50 Cent would just be bad ass Curtis from Jamaica Queens or Will Smith would just be that kid from Philly.

Any final thoughts?

I'll take this time to thank my supporters GJ, Grand G, Roc , Troy and all my fans/familia, this is the year that Delaware's entertainers show and prove that we have a story to tell.

49ers
myspace.com/the49ers
When did you start making music?

Jas Mace: I started making music back in the early 90's. I remember taking two radios with tape decks, one would play the beat, usually James Brown ( R.I.P.) that I looped on a duel cassette radio, and the other would record what I was rapping. It was horrible quality, but at the point I was only 12 years old and didn't have money or access to a studio. We didn't have pro-tools or any computer programs like they do nowadays.

Who were the early artists locally and nationally that you looked up to?

I was a huge fan of Unlimited Soul, a group from Newark , Delaware that consisted of Harun Karim, Mr. Saturday Night, & Grouchy Greg Watkins (who is now the Co-CEO of AllHipHop.com. I was also put onto some city legends from Wilmington when I first heard the Project X record. Kats like Grand G, Todd-1, and Iziah represented the streets of Wilmington at the time, and were like our Schoolly D. When I came up, I was influenced by G. Rap, Zulu's, and Native Tongues, just like now, I've always been influenced by rappers that have something to say.

What projects are you working on currently?

I'm working on my solo album "From the Cheap Seats" and the 49ers album "Equilibrium." I have a few other projects on the way, one with the Crazy 88's, and another project with Lahdik from Midnite Bully called "Nat Turner & John Brown." I'm also in the beat selection process for my follow-up solo album "The Assassination of Jas Mace."

Do you listen to the radio?

Hell No. There's garbage and brainwashing on the radio. I may listen to WVUD 91.3 or NPR, but nothing commercial. At times I listen to internet radio at home, but that's about it.

What do you think of Delaware's current live music scene?

Slept on. There are tons of live hip-hop acts out there that are still making good music, but aren't getting any recognition or given the chance to perform because once a lot of venues hear hip-hop, they automatically have the misperception their bar is going to get trashed or they will need mad security, when you probably needed more security Wednesday nights at the Stone Balloon then you ever will at one my shows!

What's the best thing about Delaware?

This is my home. Everything I do is a representation of the 302. We have nothing but love for our state, and every time we go on the road to do a show, we let it be known.

Most memorable Delaware concert experience?

Probably when I saw Chubb Rock, MC Search, and Ziggie at the Bob Carpenter Center way back in the day. Matter of fact, now that I think about it, I don't even know if I was old enough to be up in that joint. That was the first concert I went to, and ironically enough, I was performing there 10 years later opening up for Common. Everything comes back around in circles I guess.

Any final thoughts?

Just support your own, man. For the most part, blowing up in your own city is the hardest thing to do. A lot of acts get mad love when they go to California, Nevada, Virginia , or Philly, but have the hardest time making some noise in Delaware. Let's cut all that out and put Delaware on the map!

DJ Mech
myspace.com/deejaymech

When did you start making music?

I started spinning records back in 1987 on my brother's turntables and in 1994 I got my own turntables.

Who were the early artists locally and nationally that you looked up to?

Locally, I looked up to artists like Disco Beave Grand G, Doc D, and pretty much any other artists that were making moves on the local Hip-Hop scene. Nationally, my influences were Ultramagnetic MC's, Public Enemy, The Juice Crew, Mantronix, and way too many others to name.

What projects are you working on currently?

I'm working on a few beats right now for an upcoming solo album. I am also working with some of the local artists featured in this show on some beats.

Do you listen to the radio?

I don't listen to the radio much - I usually listen to NPR or sports talk. I am re-starting my radio show "The Basement Edition" on 91.3fm WVUD because mainstream radio doesn't play enough good music in my opinion.

What do you think of Delaware's current live music scene?

I think the Delaware live music scene is GREAT (for top 40 cover bands)

How many records do you own?

I own over 5000 records

What's the best thing about Delaware ?

The best thing about Delaware is its location - it's close to some of the greatest cities in America.

Tell us about your first show in Delaware?

I don't really remember my first live show in DE, but I kind of remember my first DJ gig in Delaware . I think it was a family reunion. It was around 98.6 degrees in the shade, and about 10 of my records got warped.


Square One
myspace.com/squareonemc

When did you start making music?

K.O.: I started rhyming when I was 12 yrs. old but I didn't start recording until 1998 with my former group E.S.P.N.

Alias: I started rapping in 1992 but it wasn't until 2003 that I recorded in a real studio.

Who were the early artists locally and nationally that you looked up to?

K.O.: Locally I would have to say, Beatcaso [formally known as Tyze], Grand G, Shorty Rocs, GJ, and DE's own Jig [before Jay-Z]. Nationally, Wu-Tang Clan, KRS-One, Ice Cube, and A Tribe Called Quest.

Alias: Locally I would say, E.S.P.N and nationally I would have to say, Wu-Tang and Dr. Dre

What projects are you working on currently?

K.O.: I am working on a few projects, I'm working on putting the finishing touches on the Square-One debut album titled "One=Mc2" plus I'm working on something with my Crazy 88's member Delaware's own Marchitect, but the album is untitled at the moment and later this year I will be releasing my solo project "RINGSIDE".

Alias: I'm working on the Square-One debut album.

Do you listen to the radio?

Sometimes we listen to local college radio stations to hear local talent but rest of the radio airwave is poison to our ears.

What do you think of Delaware's current live music scene?

We think the local music scene has moved Hip-Hop out of the picture blaming it on violence. Well, we think that's only an excuse because anywhere that has live entertainment is at risk of violence. We also think if the venues start opening up the doors to other categories of the Hip-Hop culture instead of focusing on one type it will make the crowd become more diverse like when venues who only allow bands, they don't just allow one kind of band they allow all type so the crowd can be diverse. If the rappers and DJs spread the love of the culture instead of only involving the same acts a lot of Hip-Hop artist could spread locally and make the pubic want to see more.

What's the story behind the name Square One?

K.O.: Me and Alias have been friends since 1991 and over the years we have watched Hip-Hop and other music in general lose it originality and creativity so one, I was in my basement messing around with a Rubix cube and thought to myself that the object of a Rubix cube is to get back to it's original square of colors while making other color patterns on the way, well that's what we are doing with Hip-Hop making other colors with this music while we take Hip-Hop back to it's original square and we both liked the idea so that's how we got the name.

What do you hope to see at this show?

We hope to see a good amount of local fans to come check out some real Hip-Hop legends, Also can't wait to see Grand G making a comeback to the scene [even thought he ain't never went nowhere]

What do you like best about Delaware?

Have you ever heard "The last shall be first"? Well, that's what we like best about DE most people in the US think they seen and heard of everything and everywhere so DE never gets mentioned too many places, but that only make us as DE artist have to work even harder at what we do so that we can be recognized but we also think that's gonna make us have a big impact on the rest of the world.

GJ


When did you start making music?

When I was 8 years old my Grandma (RIP) bought me a Casio SK1 (the first commercial sampling keyboard) and from there I was hooked. I was always writing songs and poetry, in fact I had several poems published that same year in a children's book. Much later I would get into recording when my Mama (RIP) helped me purchase a Tascam Porta 3 (4 track) recorder. That was around 1994. I would just rap over instrumentals at that time, recording in my bed room solo and doing live shows from time to time around Wilmington with my friends. In the mid 1990's a buddy turned me onto the internet, with sites like

mp3.com, and I took to that pretty well. I would upload my music in digital format and go to various Hip Hop websites with messageboards and ask people to give my music a listen. At the time I was recording under the name Regular Size Monster and I have been told that I was the first emcee on the internet to go to these various online spots with my mp3s in this manner. I got a lot of valuable feedback and had the opportunity to work with artists and producers from all over the world. It really helped me grow as an artist and an engineer.

Who were the early artists locally and nationally that you looked up to?

Well, in Delaware I was always a fan of the local independent scene, groups like Hard Response, Jon Conner, Stormwatch, Marcus Hook, Jube, Infection, Grand G, and Dunamis. Plus, I used to check out the Local Yocals show, I think that used to be on channel 22. Nationally, I would say my biggest influences are Jon Hendricks, Mantronix, Glenn Danzig, Grandmaster Caz, Rakim, Juice Crew, Jackie Wilson, and Frank Sinatra. Although I am a fan of all music and listen to everything I can get my hands on. I have a large record collection.

What projects are you working on currently?

Right now I am recording an album with Marchitect for Wonderland Records called "Space Invaders" and we are about 60% done with it. Listening to what we've finished so far, I think this is my best work. I'm also doing a little recording with Grand G.

Do you listen to the radio?

Absolutely. I have always listened to what was happening on the radio. I used to make tapes from the Mount Pleasant broadcasts and any mix show I could tune in from North Wilmington. I listen to all of them, from talk radio to country, oldies, and hip-hop. I do wish there was more jazz and reggae programming out here, though. I was the first guest rapper on Lt. Dan's Won Too Punch at WVUD and would appear semi-regularly for years. I'm currently a fan of what DJ Mech is doing there and also feeling what Rated R is doing at KISS 101.7.

What do you think of Delaware's current live music scene?

Delaware has a great community of musicians. As far back as I can remember they were always world class performers. However, there are not too many venues that support original artists and the ones who do can't seem to stay open. It's an ongoing issue to get nice places to book some of these great acts out here. I was the first rapper in Delaware to perform with a band around Wilmington's clubs and bars, all the way back in 1994 even before the Roots dropped their debut album (Do You Want More?), I was already doing shows in these places. But most venues out here were very reluctant to have hip hop music on the menu. Since the mid 1990s I think I've performed in almost every venue in the northern part of the state, from the Barn Door to the Bob Carpenter Center. It was rare that I'd be invited to perform more than once at most of these spots. Nowadays its different, the Top 40 is no longer bubble gum so much as its gangster rap and heavy metal so that's a very different environment. But the crowds have always been receptive to good music and I've got a lot of good will out here. The scene is still fragmented, although a lot of people listen to a wide range of music, you still have the hardcore bands or the punk band playing one place, the Emcees and the Deejays performing at another. Personally I love all this music. I wish I had a jazz band then I'd be doing everyone's wedding out here.

What's the best thing about Delaware?

The First State is the finest state in the union. We have no sales tax, a good job market, and some nice areas to have a house and start a family. I've been all over this nation and there is not a better place to hang your hat. Plus, you are within driving distance of so many American cultural landmarks. However, there is still too much poverty in Delaware and there are not enough wholesome outlets for the youth. We need more all age's concerts and a few more public skateparks (like they have in Smyrna). In fact there's no reason that Wilmington shouldn't have the best skateboard park on the east coast. Regardless, Wilmington is still the place to be as as far as I'm concerned and I'm out on the Market Street Mall everyday.

Any final thoughts?

Many people in Delaware don't realize what a great scene we have right here. Not only do we have all these outstanding artists, but folks take for granted that allhiphop.com came from Delaware, and that's a hugely important site, so it's really a good look for DE. It's a pleasure to work with all these talented individuals and when you see me around town don't hesitate to stop and say hey because I love this state.

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